Advisory Periods Shake Up Schedule

Spencer Hancock, Sports Section Editor

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After a long and relaxing summer, school has started back up with a bang. Some of us were ready to get back into a daily schedule, but that schedule may have been different than we expected. Not has the school start and end time been shifted backwards, but a new advisory period has been introduced into our schedule.

Advisory period takes place between our first and second periods on every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. This time period is a key time for teachers to pass out important papers and have interesting discussions with a random sample of students whom they don’t regularly see during the school day. 

Having an advisory period seems like an interesting idea, but it leaves many of us wondering why we have it three days a week instead of one day or all five days. Many of us are used to having a homeroom on just one day a week, and the additional days of advisory periods are catching us by surprise. Regardless, having advisory periods more than once a week may lead to increased opportunities to talk to students and hand out important papers. 

Another aspect of advisory periods that caught students by surprise was how the students are not divided alphabetically like the were in previous years. Instead, students have a diverse array of students in their classroom from all areas of the alphabet. Over the years, many students had gotten used to seeing people with last names close to their own, so having advisory periods mixed more randomly was an interesting change that many students didn’t expect.

To summarize, advisory periods are a new change to our school that many of us didn’t expect. Its three-days-a-week schedule and non-alphabetical sorting has thrown many of us off guard, but advisory periods may lead to interesting activities and discussions with people we normally don’t talk to. I’m interested to see what will happen next in advisory periods.